Safety

The Goodyear Driving Academy Parent Pack


Driving test passed, job done, right? Looking at the high statistics of accidents involving young drivers, maybe not. With the considerable costs of funding a child’s driving lessons, parents are often keen for them to pass their test as quickly as possible. However, teaching purely for the test can produce drivers lacking in the long term understanding to keep themselves safe on the road. Goodyear have produced the Driving Academy Parent Pack, which offers guidance to parents on how to improve young driver safety.

Parents have a direct role in young driver education as the ‘family driving instructor’, but often feel unsure of their own ability to teach the right driving skills. Even at an early age, parents have a constant indirect role, as young pre-drivers observe their own parents’ driving style and so learn driving habits, both good and bad.

It’s therefore critical that parents, schools and teachers have the right tools to inspire better learning.

In 2011, Goodyear launched the Driving Academy in schools around the UK, aiming to educated young people in road safety. Starting with the Highway Code, and progressing to a driving simulator and dual-controlled cars, the initiative has been a huge success. Now Goodyear are hoping to get parents involved.

Partnering with the DIA (Driving Instructors Association), Goodyear’s own Driving Academy Parent Pack includes tips, advice and games to play with your children, encouraging them to think about road safety and driving.

We believe that children are currently offered too much, too fast. They learn how to pass the driving test, not how to use the knowledge learnt in real life. At Goodyear, we think parents matter. It should be the role of parents, carers, teachers or grandparents to help teach road safety from an early age.

Download our Parent Pack and find out more here.

 

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